Streaming live at 10am (PST)

Blogging; The advantages/disadvantages of Webflow over Wordpress?

I am thinking about starting a blog (for monetization). I’ve been doing a lot of research about blogging and almost every time I end up hearing “Wordpress for blogging”. I’ve moved from Wordpress to Webflow early this year. And I have no regrets, loving everything that Webflow offers. And I want to use Webflow for my future blog.

I have some questions;

  • Is Webflow a good platform for blogging?
  • Why is everyone saying “Wordpress” for blogging? Is it because Wordpress is used widely? Is it because Google favors the content from Wordpress over contents from other platforms (such as Webflow, etc)?
  • Or is it like “The platform is not important as long as you make good content for your blog and Google will rank you anyways” kind of situation?
  • Does Wordpress offer some kind of “SEO tool” that is better than what we have on Webflow that helps Wordpress rank higher than Webflow sites?

Can someone please give me some solid answers/proofs? I am really trying to figure out why people say Wordpress all the time and why I should or why I should not use Webflow for blogging.

Because I really want to use Webflow, but I don’t want to end up finding out later that I should have used Wordpress.

Thank you!

1 Like

Wordpress is crazy popular, and I believe they started out as the blogging platform so it makes sense for them to claim it—even though they now have plenty of sites that do much more than just that. Personally I stay away from Wordpress for all of my development as it tends to have a lot of hidden costs (associated with hosting, management, plugins, etc.) and I don’t find it to be as user friendly for my clients to upkeep themselves.

Is Webflow a good platform for blogging?

Sure, as long as you’re paying for a CMS plan. It’s just as easy (if not easier) to add a new post and the design freedom is baked in natively without the need to rely on something like Divi or Elementor.

Why is everyone saying “Wordpress” for blogging? Is it because Wordpress is used widely? Is it because Google favors the content from Wordpress over contents from other platforms (such as Webflow, etc)?

Like I mentioned above, it’s because Wordpress was one of the original blogging platforms. This is marketing though, think of this as their brand tagline. It makes people feel like they can only really blog on their platform over the near-endless alternatives available.

Google is pretty tight-lipped on how to best achieve good organic ranking, however just like any other search engine they rely on the website following good SEO practices. This includes proper site structure, relevant content, site speed, back links, etc. Any site on any platform that follows the guidelines will rank well, however keep in mind that certain industries may be more competitive and harder to break into than others. That’s why it’s recommended that you carve out a niche instead of trying to reinvent the wheel.

Or is it like “The platform is not important as long as you make good content for your blog and Google will rank you anyways” kind of situation?

Bingo. That said, some platforms just plain perform better than others due to how their sites are packaged/delivered which is entirely out of your control. Thankfully this is something that I find Webflow excels at over other SaaS website platforms.

Does Wordpress offer some kind of “SEO tool” that is better than what we have on Webflow that helps Wordpress rank higher than Webflow sites?

Out of the box I don’t believe there is anything different between the two, however most Wordpress sites I’ve had to work with have a plugin called Yoast that offers some hand-holding tools to help with ensuring you’ve got all your bases covered. That said, Webflow should provide all you need to take care of the things that matter most when it comes to SEO.

Hope that helps give you some insight, feel free to ask any other questions you may have.

1 Like

Hi @cakeantidote,
Webflow does not offer features that some may require. No tags, no cat/subcat/post structure, only one template per CMS collection versus many (Conditionals are only a weak workaround since the content is there but just hidden which means loaded by the browser). Some consider the RTE to be weak on features compared to Gutenburg or other advanced visual editors (Wordpress has options, Webflow does not). No support for AMP (WP has a plugin). Image handling has limitations in RTE fields with Webflow compared to the media features in WP. WF has no built in user or commenting systems which you may need. No plugin system to extend the core functionality exists for WF as it is pretty much a black box which can be a plus if you think security.

These are just ones off the top of my head. It is better to make a list of what you require now then see if what you need is present with WF. Then you can make an intelligent decision.

Personally If I was building a blog today that I wanted to monetize it would be with GHOST.

3 Likes

Thank you for taking the time for writing this detailed reply. This is the answer I needed.

Of course. It’s worth taking into account some of what @webdev brought up, however I’d argue that what’s mentioned in no way prevents someone from operating a blog on the Webflow platform. Also, Udesly has a Webflow to Ghost conversion app that may be of interest if you feel like taking his advice on having your blog on that platform instead.

Thank you for explaning these details.

I am also aware of some features Wordpress has, Webflow doesn’t. I discover those missing features when I was moving to Webflow from Wordpress. As you mentioned, some features as tags, categories, etc. I learned to live with it, I guess.

And I think the great features that Webflow offers are still good enough for me to stick with it.

Never heard of Ghost. I will check it out. Thank you!

I will definitely check Ghost!